ARDMSThe ARDMS registry exams typically are the next step after graduation. From our research the time it takes to prepare is really dependent on the student and the various learning styles. Typically 1 to 2 exams are taken in the first year after graduation. Many places of employment require the registration within the first year of working.

That is on top of the fact that more and more employers are requiring the applicant to be registered to be even considered for a position

Knowing that a 100+ question exam that will take a couple hours or more to complete that is multiple choice and graded by a computer will determine a  significant portion of your future will make anyone sweat.

The good thing is that what you score doesn’t matter as long as you get enough questions correct.

So why is preparation key?

If you go into the test confident about your ability to think and answer questions under pressure you take most of the things we typically worry about out of the equation.

Preparing for the Sonographic Principles and Instrumentation exam (SPI) will be different than preparing for the Abdomen exam. The main thing we notice with the SPI is that it is all based on relationships. Many times you don’t need to have a formula memorized but know the relationships that the formula is based on. For example, if PRF goes up what happens to the PRP? These types of relationships are crucial to passing the SPI exam.

Preparing for the Abdomen will be more on Anatomy and Pathology. So what we do is classify the areas that are the most commonly tested such as the liver and pancreas. We feel that being prepared in the major organs is a large portion of being prepared. The great thing is you know this stuff. We just have to help you either remember it or bring it to the forefront of your memory so when you are sitting in the exam you don’t feel lost or un-prepared.

Remember, confidence is the key. You can only know so much. But I guarantee that you know more than you think you do.

By the way, what is the absolute worst thing that could happen? Fail the test? Well, what we call that is a sneak peak to what you have to study for. If that were to happen. Leave the testing center. Make a list of those items that you just did not know. Don’t worry about the stuff that you are sure you got correct. Take the test again and pass with flying colors.

Either way we are here to get you to that point. If you have any questions you can get an instructor by email anytime. Or you can email me [googleplusauthor] at franco@examrefresh.com

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I am the founder and lead Instructor here at ExamRefresh.com. I strive to help those that are entering the field of Ultrasound to be the best that they can be. Ultrasound is my passion.

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Comments

  1. Elizabeth Vargas says:

    HI.. EVERY ONE …I AM VERY HAPPY WITH ALL MY PRACTICE IN 10/20/100 PRACTICE TEST IN SPI…EVERY TIME I CAN PRACTICE , AS WELL FLASHCARDS VERY,VERY HELPFUL. VIDEOS AND EXPLANATIONS ARE WELL DONE, EASSY TO UNDERSTAND AND FOLLOW..ONLY U NEED TO TAKE OR MAKE THE TIME EVERY DAY IN ORDER TO REMEMBER AND AVAILABLE TO PASS THE TEST.THANK YOU..FOR THIS SITE ..I HAVE NOW THE CONFIDENCE THAT I WILL DO WELL IN MY SPI REGISTER TEST, AND SOON AFTYER THAT I WILL COMEBACK AGAIN TO THIS SITE FOR ABDOMINAL AND OTHER. THANK YOU.
    SINCERLY,
    ELIZABETH VARGAS

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